Entrapment Neuropathy: More Than Just Carpal Tunnel!

An entrapment neuropathy, also called nerve compression syndrome, occurs when a nerve is wedged or “pinched” against a bone, inflamed muscle, or other internal mechanism in your arm.

Most people have heard of carpal tunnel syndrome. What you might not know is that carpal tunnel syndrome is only one of a family of ailments in the upper limbs known as entrapment neuropathies. The other entrapment neuropathies are not as well-known in the mainstream as CTS, and so people who suffer from nerve symptoms in their forearms and hands frequently jump to conclusions. NeuropathyDR® is here to help set the record straight!

mail 4 Entrapment Neuropathy: More Than Just Carpal Tunnel!

Diagnosis for all compression neuropathies is fairly consistent.

An entrapment neuropathy, also called nerve compression syndrome, occurs when a nerve is wedged or “pinched” against a bone, inflamed muscle, or other internal mechanism in your arm. Aside from the median nerve (the one associated with CTS) there are two main nerves that help to control your arm and hand: the radial nerve and the ulnar nerve. Both are susceptible to compression, and the results can be painful!

Entrapment occurs under a number of conditions, most commonly:

  • When there is an injury originating at your neck or a disease of the cervical spine
  • When your elbow has been injured due to fractures or improper use
  • When your wrist has been injured due to fractures or Guyon canal alignment problems
  • An aneurysm or thrombosis in your arteries
  • Factors commonly associated with peripheral neuropathy, such as diabetes, rheumatism, alcoholism, or infection

Your radial nerve runs the length of your arm, and is responsible for both movement and sensation. Radial neuropathy usually occurs at the back of the elbow, and can present itself with many of the common symptoms of neuropathy such as tingling, loss of sensation, weakness and reduced muscle control (in this case, often difficulty in turning your palm upwards with your elbow extended).

A number of palsies affect the radial nerve, such as:

  • Saturday night palsy (also called Honeymooner’s palsy), where your radial nerve is compressed in your upper arm by falling asleep in a position where pressure is exerted on it by either furniture or a bed partner
  • Crutch palsy, where your nerve is pinched by poorly-fitted axillary crutches
  • Handcuff neuropathy, wherein tight handcuffs compress your radial nerve at your wrists

Two main conditions affect the ulnar nerve: Guyon’s canal syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome. Guyon’s canal syndrome is almost exactly the same in symptoms as carpal tunnel syndrome (pain and tingling in the palm and first three fingers), but involves a completely different nerve. Guyon’s canal syndrome is caused by pressure on your wrists, often by resting them at a desk or workstation, and is frequently experienced by cyclists due to pressure from the handlebars.

Nearly everyone has experienced cubital tunnel syndrome: it’s the “dead arm” sensation we’ve all felt when we wake up after sleeping on top of our arm! Sleeping with your arm folded up compresses the ulnar nerve at your shoulder, causing it to effectively “cut off” feeling to your arm. As you probably know from experience, this sensation is unsettling but temporary.

Diagnosis for all compression neuropathies is fairly consistent: your NeuropathyDR® clinician will examine your arms for signs of neuropathy, and will likely ask you to perform several demonstrations of dexterity.  If your clinician suspects you may have an underlying condition, nerve or blood tests may be recommended. To pinpoint the specific location of a compression, your clinician may also suggest MRI or x-ray scans.

Similar to carpal tunnel syndrome, most cases of compression neuropathy are mild. Treatment for these mild cases involves ice, rest, and a change in habits of motion or stress that are causing the symptoms. For more severe cases, your clinician may prescribe painkillers or anti-inflammatories, and in extreme cases, a surgical solution is sometimes justified.

If you suffer from a compression neuropathy or have questions about this or any other kind of neuropathy, NeuropathyDR® can help! Contact us, and we can answer your questions and put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician in your area who has been specially trained to treat any symptoms you might have. As with any neuropathy, don’t wait! The sooner a condition is diagnosed, the more options for treatment your clinician will have.

Do you or someone you know suffer from CTS? Join the conversation at Beating Neuropathy!

 

References:

http://www.mdguidelines.com/neuropathy-of-radial-nerve-entrapment
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1285531-overview
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1244885-overview
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2599973/?tool=pmcentrez

 

Entrapment Neuropathy: More Than Just Carpal Tunnel! is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Entrapment Neuropathy: More Than Just Carpal Tunnel!

An entrapment neuropathy, also called nerve compression syndrome, occurs when a nerve is wedged or “pinched” against a bone, inflamed muscle, or other internal mechanism in your arm.

Most people have heard of carpal tunnel syndrome. What you might not know is that carpal tunnel syndrome is only one of a family of ailments in the upper limbs known as entrapment neuropathies. The other entrapment neuropathies are not as well-known in the mainstream as CTS, and so people who suffer from nerve symptoms in their forearms and hands frequently jump to conclusions. NeuropathyDR® is here to help set the record straight!

mail 4 Entrapment Neuropathy: More Than Just Carpal Tunnel!

Diagnosis for all compression neuropathies is fairly consistent.

An entrapment neuropathy, also called nerve compression syndrome, occurs when a nerve is wedged or “pinched” against a bone, inflamed muscle, or other internal mechanism in your arm. Aside from the median nerve (the one associated with CTS) there are two main nerves that help to control your arm and hand: the radial nerve and the ulnar nerve. Both are susceptible to compression, and the results can be painful!

Entrapment occurs under a number of conditions, most commonly:

  • When there is an injury originating at your neck or a disease of the cervical spine
  • When your elbow has been injured due to fractures or improper use
  • When your wrist has been injured due to fractures or Guyon canal alignment problems
  • An aneurysm or thrombosis in your arteries
  • Factors commonly associated with peripheral neuropathy, such as diabetes, rheumatism, alcoholism, or infection

Your radial nerve runs the length of your arm, and is responsible for both movement and sensation. Radial neuropathy usually occurs at the back of the elbow, and can present itself with many of the common symptoms of neuropathy such as tingling, loss of sensation, weakness and reduced muscle control (in this case, often difficulty in turning your palm upwards with your elbow extended).

A number of palsies affect the radial nerve, such as:

  • Saturday night palsy (also called Honeymooner’s palsy), where your radial nerve is compressed in your upper arm by falling asleep in a position where pressure is exerted on it by either furniture or a bed partner
  • Crutch palsy, where your nerve is pinched by poorly-fitted axillary crutches
  • Handcuff neuropathy, wherein tight handcuffs compress your radial nerve at your wrists

Two main conditions affect the ulnar nerve: Guyon’s canal syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome. Guyon’s canal syndrome is almost exactly the same in symptoms as carpal tunnel syndrome (pain and tingling in the palm and first three fingers), but involves a completely different nerve. Guyon’s canal syndrome is caused by pressure on your wrists, often by resting them at a desk or workstation, and is frequently experienced by cyclists due to pressure from the handlebars.

Nearly everyone has experienced cubital tunnel syndrome: it’s the “dead arm” sensation we’ve all felt when we wake up after sleeping on top of our arm! Sleeping with your arm folded up compresses the ulnar nerve at your shoulder, causing it to effectively “cut off” feeling to your arm. As you probably know from experience, this sensation is unsettling but temporary.

Diagnosis for all compression neuropathies is fairly consistent: your NeuropathyDR® clinician will examine your arms for signs of neuropathy, and will likely ask you to perform several demonstrations of dexterity.  If your clinician suspects you may have an underlying condition, nerve or blood tests may be recommended. To pinpoint the specific location of a compression, your clinician may also suggest MRI or x-ray scans.

Similar to carpal tunnel syndrome, most cases of compression neuropathy are mild. Treatment for these mild cases involves ice, rest, and a change in habits of motion or stress that are causing the symptoms. For more severe cases, your clinician may prescribe painkillers or anti-inflammatories, and in extreme cases, a surgical solution is sometimes justified.

If you suffer from a compression neuropathy or have questions about this or any other kind of neuropathy, NeuropathyDR® can help! Contact us, and we can answer your questions and put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician in your area who has been specially trained to treat any symptoms you might have. As with any neuropathy, don’t wait! The sooner a condition is diagnosed, the more options for treatment your clinician will have.

Do you or someone you know suffer from CTS? Join the conversation at Beating Neuropathy!

 

References:

http://www.mdguidelines.com/neuropathy-of-radial-nerve-entrapment
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1285531-overview
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1244885-overview
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2599973/?tool=pmcentrez

 

Entrapment Neuropathy: More Than Just Carpal Tunnel! is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

What’s The Best Neuropathy Treatment Diet Plan?

In almost every illness, including neuropathy, consuming a carbohydrate-controlled diet, low in sugar and animal products, can go a long way toward helping us feel and function better.

Last time, we spoke about the importance of knowing as much as possible about your underlying condition that may be contributing to or causing your neuropathy and related symptoms.

Fotolia 41513033 XS 287x300 What’s The Best Neuropathy Treatment Diet Plan?

Regardless of your underlying diagnosis, there are a few basic principles that can help us all be healthier and happier.

For example carpal tunnel syndrome, shingles, and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy are all conditions that are drastically different–but are forms of neuropathy. This is important to know because it will allow you to seek the best care possible.

But, regardless of your underlying diagnosis, there are a few basic principles that can help us all be healthier and happier.

This revolves around our own lifestyle and diet.

For example, we know that in almost every illness consuming a carbohydrate-controlled diet, low in sugar and animal products, can go a long way toward helping us feel and function better.

It makes sense, doesn’t it? You know that your car performs the best when all preventive maintenance services are done and is provided with the best possible fuel.

Our bodies are no different.

Of course, your health conditions—things like insulin-dependent diabetes—may require very specific diet changes.

With all that said, we do know there are some specific things that can be done to will help almost anybody with neuropathy and chronic pain.

Here are my big three:

  1. Eliminate milk and dairy products from your diet.
  2. Go gluten-free wherever possible, minimize grains, and limit or eliminate meats.
  3. Make the bulk of your diet plant (vegetable) based. Be very careful with fruit and starchy vegetables, aiming for approximately 15 g of carbs per meal. The only exception to increased carbohydrates could be during times of heavy exercise.

A typical day may start with a shake with added protein powder or a small amount of gluten-free granola with coconut/almond/rice milk. Three hours later, a small snack, like half an apple and a few nuts.

Lunch is a salad with some lean protein (fish, chicken, or tofu) and added olive oil. Snack again in 3 hours.

Finally, dinner may be some grilled veggies with another serving of lean, low fat protein.

Many patients ask us, “Can my neuropathy diet really be this simple?”

The answer is an emphatic YES!

Join the conversation–and share your food ideas–on our Facebook page, Beating Neuropathy!

What’s The Best Neuropathy Treatment Diet Plan? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Neuropathy–Should You Call Yours Something Else?

The more you know about your neuropathy, the more we can help identify the most appropriate treatment.

It wasn’t that long ago when physicians and patients alike believed that peripheral neuropathy wasn’t treatable by anything but medication.

Female Doc Profile 5 Neuropathy  Should You Call Yours Something Else?

It’s critical wherever possible to obtain an accurate diagnosis.

The sad part is, there are still many physicians and patients that believe this to be the case. In the last few years, we have learned this is no longer exclusively true.

For example, we now know that some tools, including things like dietary supplementation, some forms of physical therapy, and technologies like neurostimulation and cold laser, can have a tremendous positive effect on the outcome of many patients with peripheral neuropathy and, indeed, many forms of chronic pain. This can help patients reduce medication dosages—and sometimes eliminate medication and its side effects.

Peripheral neuropathy is actually a name that can be applied to many painful conditions of the nervous system. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy. Shingles is another form of neuropathy. We all know about diabetic and chemotherapy-related neuropathy.

Obviously, these are dramatically different conditions, but with similar symptoms in patients.

All this leads to extreme frustration by patients.

And it’s very confusing for patients and their professionals to just call it “neuropathy”. This is because there are substantial differences between genetic neuropathies like CMT, HNPP, and those caused by more common factors—let’s say, things like diabetes and statin medication.

There is also a vast degree of difference in treatability of the very different forms of neuropathy. For example, if your neuropathy was caused by something like poor diet or statin medication, often removing medications and improving diet over time can eliminate most, if not all, neuropathy symptoms. Of course, this is something that requires extreme diligence on the part of the patient and, often, appropriate treatment by clinicians to help restore function.

However, in other cases, like genetic neuropathies, patients may face a possible lifetime of pain, and physical impairments.

Now don’t get me wrong; often we are able to help many patients—even with genetic neuropathy—dramatically improve the quality of their life too.

But the point of today’s article is to point out that the more you know about your condition, the more we can—together—help to identify the most appropriate clinic treatment and home care.

This is why it’s critical wherever possible to obtain an accurate diagnosis. And then apply that name to your form of peripheral neuropathy.

Even if you’re ultimately diagnosed with idiopathic (meaning “unknown causes”) neuropathy, it will allow you and your doctors to identify the most current and powerful treatment strategies.

But, always remember: the most important thing, regardless of the name of your particular type of neuropathy, is your own self-care.

Join the conversation–with thousands of patients AND healthcare professionals–on Facebook!

Neuropathy–Should You Call Yours Something Else? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Better Neuropathy Home Care

Contact a local NeuropathyDR® professional or physical therapist to explore treatment options in addition to taking care better of yourself!

Fotolia 48282465 S 300x200 Better Neuropathy Home Care

Before you begin any healthcare regimen, always talk to your professional first.

Move As Much As Possible!

You don’t have to run a marathon, or even walk one. You don’t have to race a titanium frame bicycle. Just move the big muscles in your legs as often and as much as you possibly can. Exercise, even very gently at first, improves circulation. Improved blood flow to the legs and feet will help nourish damaged nerves.

A Warm Bath Can Do Wonders

Warm baths increase blood flow; reduce stress and aid in relaxation. All three of these benefits will make the pain a little easier to tolerate. But a word to the wise, check the water temperature with your elbow or your wrist before you get in the bathtub. The nerve damage in your feet makes them an unreliable source for judging temperature. Use a thermometer. We like 100 degrees Fahrenheit with some added minerals like Epsom salts (don’t be stingy) and antioxidants.

Take Targeted Supplements

Vitamins B-1, B-12, B-6 and folic acid are all vital to healthy nerves. We have found certain combinations in professionally tailored packages for each case often works best. In our clinics, we now use the NDGen™ Metabolic Support Packs that Dr. John Hayes personally designed. If you eat a healthy diet, you may still not be getting the recommended daily amount of some vitamins and other nutrients. Talk to your professional first before taking any supplements to make sure they won’t interact badly with the medications you’re taking.*

Control—or, Better Yet, Eliminate Your Alcohol Intake

High intake of alcohol is a toxin to your nerves. And if the nerves are already damaged, it’s even worse. Some people think that a drink a day is good for your health. I respectfully disagree. If you have nerve damage, that’s a chance you don’t need to take.  Don’t drink more than four alcoholic beverages a week if you suffer from peripheral neuropathy; none would be even better.

This is EXACTLY Why NeuropathyDR® Doctors and Physical Therapists Are Trained

Before you begin any self-care regimen or add supplements, herbs, or vitamins to your healthcare regimen, always talk to your professional first. Virtually everything has some side effects, so make sure that what you’re planning to take won’t cause you more harm than good.

And Above All Else…

Don’t give up.  Self-care is vital to managing your neuropathy.  While you may need a combination of these self-care tips and medication, sorting out yourself is not always wise.

Contact a local NeuropathyDR® professional or physical therapist to explore treatment options in addition to taking care better of yourself!

*You can easily check for drug-nutrient interactions online. Special caution is advised in thyroid disease and cancer therapies during neuropathy care.

Join the conversation with other Neuropathy patients AND healthcare professionals!

Better Neuropathy Home Care is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Neuropathy and GREAT Foot Care

If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy you need to take special care of your feet and be very aware of any sign of problems.

If you have diabetes…

diabeticmeter 300x116 Neuropathy and GREAT Foot Care

Many people with diabetes don’t realize how toxic high blood sugar is.

Or you’ve had shingles…

Even if you’ve completed a successful course of chemotherapy…

And you suffer from pain or burning in your feet, legs or hands, you could have peripheral neuropathy.

You’re not alone…

You don’t have to just live with it…

You don’t necessarily have to swallow more pills and pay for more expensive prescriptions…

There are things you can do to help manage your pain.

More than half the people suffering from neuropathy report that they’ve tried some complementary treatments in addition to traditional medicine to relieve their pain.

There are many things you can do daily at home to help you improve your pain. Here are few to think about:

If You Have Diabetic Neuropathy, Control Your Blood Sugar

This may sound like a no-brainer but many people with diabetes don’t realize how toxic high blood sugar is. High blood sugar is what causes nerve pain and damage. Keeping blood sugar levels close to normal can not only stop ongoing damage; some damage may even be reversible. That provides even more promise for fighting neuropathy pain.

Take Care of Your Feet

Nerve pain is usually what brings people in to see their doctors. But the numbness in their feet and inability to feel even the smallest injury can lead to infections and ulceration and ultimately end in amputation. If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy you need to take special care of your feet and be very aware of any sign of problems. Some things you can do are:

  • Clean and inspect your feet every day. If you have an injury that’s not healing properly, call your doctor immediately.
  • Wear comfortable shoes. Don’t wear shoes that pinch your toes or rub blisters on your heels.
  • Wear padded socks to cushion the ball of your feet and the heel.
  • Either cut your toenails straight across or have a professional do it for you.

All of these things can go a long way to making your quality of life with neuropathy as good as it can be!

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Neuropathy and GREAT Foot Care is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

First Steps in Dealing With Peripheral Neuropathy

Further altering your lifestyle can help tremendously in dealing with your peripheral neuropathy.

Last time, we talked about some of the first steps you can take after being diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy.

doctorlady 201x300 First Steps in Dealing With Peripheral Neuropathy

Have a health care professional with whom you can discuss ideas and suggestions openly and freely.

Next, even if you are moderately overweight (as little as 20 pounds) you must make every effort to reduce this weight ASAP.

Thirdly, we strongly recommend you initially try an avoidance diet. An avoidance diet typically consists of brown rice, tea, banana, and applesauce in very small frequent servings, accompanied by several glasses of water per day for a couple of days, and then proceed to a largely “Paleo” type diet. Now if this is all new to you, we caution you to make changes to your diet slowly.

In case you are not familiar, a Paleo diet largely consists of vegetables, with small amounts of high-quality protein such as organic chicken breast, fillet of salmon or other cold-water fish, rarely red meat, no grains, and other high-protein vegetable foods such as beans.

I can’t emphasize how critical this can be. We do know there are many environmental triggers for many disorders, including neurologic disorders such as peripheral neuropathy. Some are contained in food, but some are also due to our own exposure.

This is why further altering your lifestyle, including drinking only filtered water, avoiding cleaning chemicals and other toxins, and staying away from artificial preservatives and processed foods can help tremendously.

It is also very important to have a health care professional with whom you can discuss ideas and suggestions openly and freely. You need to be treated with respect. It is also quite likely that you’ll require periodic laboratory and other diagnostic tests. Please follow your professional’s recommendations.

Your professional should serve as an advocate for a healthy lifestyle and as therapeutic nutrition, not drug-only care.

It is also important to understand that early intervention, in terms of pain management, physical therapy, and rehabilitation can make a huge difference in your long-term outcome.

In summary, peripheral neuropathy and similar acute illness, like so many issues in life, require a game plan.

Being prepared goes a long way towards having a better end result! Join the conversation on Facebook.

First Steps in Dealing With Peripheral Neuropathy is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

I Could Have Neuropathy? Now What Do I Do?

Very often, patients who are faced with an acute onset of peripheral neuropathy or other devastating disorder have difficulty deciding what to do first.

So what I would like to do today is outline some of the critical steps that we find helpful; things you seriously need to take a look at if you or a loved one are confronted with peripheral neuropathy or another serious illness.

Fotolia 5256891 XS 300x200 I Could Have Neuropathy? Now What Do I Do?

The most important thing to do is to take a serious look at our own health habits.

Primarily, it is essential to identify any true medical emergency. This, of course, would be the sudden onset of pain, fever, swelling, extreme fatigue, et cetera. Regardless of your past history, it is essential that you obtain as accurate a diagnosis as possible, as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, this is becoming more difficult.

There still is no substitute for a major medical center for diagnostic purposes.

Next, regardless of the underlying diagnosis, sometimes initial medical care is essential. For example, in cases like inflammatory neuropathy or acute autoimmune diseases, periods of medication or even hospitalization may be necessary. It is during this phase that things such as laboratory diagnoses and electrodiagnostic studies like EMGs, and possibly even PET scans, are conducted. If you are evaluated at a hospital or medical center, you will likely see many different specialists; this is okay, if necessary.

But from a simple, patient-centered perspective, we find the most important thing to do is to take a serious look at our own health habits. Unfortunately, most of us don’t pay attention until we are confronted with a serious illness or health issue. If you smoke, consume too much sugar in the form of candy, soda, et cetera, it is essential that you stop these habits immediately.

Next time, we’ll talk about more of what these options may be. Join the conversation on Facebook!

I Could Have Neuropathy? Now What Do I Do? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Answering Your Neuropathy Questions, Part 2

One of the most frustrating things about peripheral neuropathy, for both patients and doctors, is that you may never know with 100% certainty what caused it.

mail 5 Answering Your Neuropathy Questions, Part 2Last time we talked about some of the questions that we commonly get regarding neuropathy and chronic pain. Here are more of our opinions regarding these questions:

  • The next thing to understand is that very rarely does drug therapy alone help peripheral neuropathy. For example, some drugs, especially early on, may help calm symptoms—but only to a point. Then virtually every medication has side effects to deal with. Now this is not to say that drugs do not have a place; they certainly do. But when drug-only symptomatic therapy is employed at the expense of leaving out things like proper physical therapy, fitness, and dietary corrections, the net result is the worsening of neuropathy over time.
  • One of the most frustrating things about peripheral neuropathy, for both patients and doctors, is that you may never know with 100% certainty what caused your neuropathy. So, the best advice I can give you is to focus upon factors you can correct—like obesity, poor diet, activity levels, et cetera.

If your neuropathy has progressed to the point that significant pain and disability has resulted, usage of medication judiciously is fine, but also make sure that newer treatment methods such as laser & LED therapy, advances in nutrition science, and advanced neurostimulation are all employed.

As frustrating as peripheral neuropathy is, it is imperative that you understand our chief objective is to help you improve your quality of life. No, this is not an easy task. Quite frankly it is enormous.

It becomes even more challenging when there are complications including other illnesses, bad family history or genetics, and so on.

Always remember, we are here to help you. Treating peripheral neuropathy, like most forms of chronic pain, is a work in progress.

It does require due diligence, and significant cooperation between professionals and patients.

I am here to support YOU!

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Answering Your Neuropathy Questions, Part 2 is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Answering Your Neuropathy Questions, Part 1

Unfortunately, there is a great deal of misinformation regarding the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

Recently, we asked our neuropathy patients to ask us questions about what bothers them most about peripheral neuropathy and chronic pain. Not surprisingly, a lot of the questions were the same:

Fotolia 38105735 S 300x218 Answering Your Neuropathy Questions, Part 1

Treating peripheral neuropathy can be very challenging.

“How can I treat my neuropathy if I don’t know what caused it?”

“I’m not diabetic, all my lab values are just borderline, so my doctor says I am ok, and I couldn’t have neuropathy. How can this be?”

…and so on.

We also hear, “All my doctors do is give me medications. I feel great when I take my medications, but I am sleepy all the time and I have side effects like diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness.”

As you probably know, treating peripheral neuropathy can be very challenging. The reasons for this are multiple. Unfortunately, there is a great deal of misinformation regarding the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

So what I would like to do today is dispel a couple of myths and give our guests some opinions!

  • Do not wait for a complete understanding as to what might have caused your neuropathy before you begin to treat it. The reason for this is very simple. The vast majority of peripheral neuropathies are what is called idiopathic; meaning we are not 100% sure what the cause is. The reality is, the vast majority of idiopathic cases do in fact turn out to be what is called metabolic syndrome—or, quite simply, obesity. Even being as little as 20 pounds overweight, and having a diet that is too high in refined sugars can lead to elevated blood sugars and other lab vitals that, over time, can cause peripheral neuropathy. Many doctors are simply unaware of this fact, so patients go years before any corrective action is taken.

To be continued…

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Answering Your Neuropathy Questions, Part 1 is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists